Presentation

  • Florencia Santucho
  • Alicia Puleo
  • Roberto Perez Rocha
  • Malena Bystrowicz
  • Luis L. Leguizamón

Florencia Santucho

Director

This very special 5th edition of the [FINCA] festival takes place in an unprecedented global context, up to now only imaginable in a science fiction-type of dystopian world. Measures taken in response to COVID-19 crisis have stopped the machinery of the global system to avoid the spread of the disease, with tragic social and economic consequences.

Although preventive isolation has forced us to adapt to an online format, we took on the challenge of pouring into the web the knowledge and practices socio-environmental cinema offers to reflect critically upon the causes of the current situation and the possible ways out. Holding online discussions s, workshops and seminars will allow for an exchange that can bring us back to action  and rekindle hope  in a new possible world.

One of the main reasons behind the emergencies we are experiencing today at a global level, the climate crisis — this year’s theme — is human activity relying on an unsustainable production and consumption model. Unless we put an end to our dependency on fossil fuels and limit greenhouse gas emissions within the next ten years, by means of a socio-ecological transition based on food sovereignty, the consequences might be devastating.

[FINCA] supports youth movements as drivers of change, as well as the feminist “green wave” and the relentless fight of indigenous peoples, in the establishment of a new systemic paradigm that promotes reducing  consumption in pursuit of social and environmental justice, with common goods not being commodified and a life in reciprocity with nature. That is why this year we welcome again the Young Jury and present the Finca for Kids section, aimed at younger audiences, along with traditional Schools section, which features around 40 films made by children. Additionally, to ensure access to all this free content, we will create downloadable educational packages.

Such a crisis demands radical changes in our society which we can only bring about by embracing the ecofeminist vision of inter- and eco-dependence of living beings (now the focus of  a new section), as Alicia Puleo and Vandana Shiva remind us of in their invaluable contribution to this edition.

Pursuing a greater social impact on diverse realities at a national level, during the second half of 2020, [FINCA] will continue promoting cinema seasons, seminars and specific workshops in the context of a Campaign to actively raise awareness on the climate crisis, aimed at young children and teenagers, as well as educational institutions in Argentina.

For the change not to be climatic but a change in our system of life, we are #AdvocatingForANewClimate

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Alicia Puleo

Ecofeminist philosopher, author of Ecofeminist Keys. For Rebels who Love the Earth and Animals (2019) and Ecofeminism for A New Possible World (2011)

An image is worth a thousand words. In this famous phrase lies a profound truth. There are still many who don’t have a real grasp of the ecological crisis and climate emergency we are going through. How can we help wake up citizen consciousness? We can show data and environmental reports, we can foster the observation of signs of environmental deterioration all around us and share the words of thousands of scientists that warn us about the ecosystem’s destruction and the ongoing sixth extinction of species. All of this is very important and inescapable. But we would be missing something: the emotional connection images provide. The International Environmental Film Festival matches unforgettable images with our era’s eco-social concepts and challenges.

Now that, with the COVID-19 crisis, we are experiencing our own vulnerability, it’s time to admit we are part of the immense network of life and that destroying it is suicidal. There will be no future worth living if we perpetuate the old patriarchal paradigm of dominance over the Other, a dominance that, today, presents itself as unsustainable development, neoliberal globalization and devastating extractivism.

It is time to slow down, get informed and reflect in order to – as Gandhi would say – “be the change you want to see in the world”. Nowadays, speaking of justice involves thinking in terms of ecojustice as well, and welcome silenced voices in the debate. That is why ecofeminism fosters visibilization and overriding of androcentricity, which despises approaches and tasks based on care, as they have always been considered feminine; supporting and learning about the resilience of indigenous peoples, the first line of defense of the Earth; getting familiar with alternative means of production and consumption, as agroecology, degrowth and food sovereignty; and taking the anthropocentric blindfold off our eyes to see the inconceivable suffering of non-human animals due to intensive exploitation…

We are at a decisive moment in the history of humankind. The course we take in the next few years will determine our destiny and that of the rest of the living beings inhabiting the Earth. The classic definition of the human being as the opposite to other animals and independent of the ecosystems stains most cultural manifestations with androanthropocentrism. I congratulate FINCA’s organizers for offering a different, empathetic, solidary, intersectional and emancipatory vision that explores the horizons of a new possible world.

http://aliciapuleo.net/

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Roberto Pérez Rocha

Founder and Director of Films 4 Transparency

Films 4 Transparency
International Anti-Corruption Film Festival

Films 4 Transparency is your space to watch documentaries from all over the world focusing on the negative effects of corruption on the environment, Human Rights and, most importantly, on its impact on the less favored people and social groups. At the same time, F4T seeks to inspire by showing the work of directors intimately involved with the topic they center their work on and show how one single individual or community can fight for their rights, including the right to live in a healthy, sustainable environment, so as to generate positive changes for everyone.

F4T is a unique vehicle for reflection and critical debate. It stems from Transparency International, the global coalition fighting for transparency and against corruption.

Filmmaking has become the most effective tool to raise awareness, weaving bridges for small and large actions alike, fostering solidarity and collective action, both at a local and global scale. That is why we believe in the need of using film festivals and film exhibitions to promote a new education and the transmission of the value of transparency in everyday duties as a common good.

Since its first official edition, F4T has forged strong alliances with other festivals, foundations, government agencies and international organizations, as well as civil society groups from all over the world. We are proud to partner with the International Environmental Film Festival in Argentina (FINCA), an event we have collaborated with in its last editions.

F4T is the first and only international festival focusing on corruption and its effects on society, the environment and human rights as its thematic aim and a tool to connect the civil society with the private and public sectors to solve this issue that affects us all.

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Malena Bystrowicz

5th FINCA Programming Coordinator

Amazonian Focus

A few months ago there was a warning sign that foreshadowed this tragic end of an era, which humanity is both suffering from and causing.

Through satellites in orbit, drones and even microscopical details, we saw our green Amazon rainforest on fire. All that wonderful technology, so overrated these days, devoted to developing apps for long-distance relationships, or scientific progress in the search for a cure for the pandemic cannot make up for the destruction that hurts not only people, but also each one of the species of the planet and its vital resources.

The Amazonia, was awfully reduced –  its diverse fertility was transformed into mere smoke. We knew then that it wouldn’t regenerate for many decades. We watched in distress how the animals escaped from the flames that engulfed Australia. We were outraged at the irresponsible governments that prioritize the market and this no-longer-sustainable system.

“Capitalism has died but we’re living inside its corpse”, summarizes the Italian philosopher Franco Berardi.

This was a turning point to start a focus on the Amazonia: the lungs, the soul and the heart of our Americas. Still unaware of the threat that COVID-19 would pose for us, we had the feeling we had reached the limit. The burning of the Amazon rainforest was an alert, and we understood there was no coming back and how urgent and necessary collective transformation is.

The Amazonia is one of the few places in the world where nature puts on a fight, in spite of the damaging exploitation of its delicate ecosystem, which ranges from deforestation, extractivism, hydroelectric activity to the never-ending threat to its indigenous peoples, who still resist, to protect and honor it. Both plundering and organized struggle can be seen and analyzed in the stories of this selection of four films from Peru, Brazil and Ecuador. Perhaps, focusing on this part of the world might help us change it all and start from scratch.

That is our ambitious desire.

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Luis Leonardo Leguizamón

Schools Section Coordinator

Threatened by COVID-19 and the current global health emergency, we find ourselves in very complex times where the exercise of pedagogy now takes place within our homes. Teachers and families alike have engaged in this new virtual form that schools have adopted and complement one another on their roles, carrying out the educational process within the context and with the resources available to every kid and institution. In this scenario, we face the major challenge of reinventing ourselves in this section.

This year, the Schools section includes its traditional programming, featuring a selection of international shorts and around 40 films made entirely by students. In addition to this, more than 50 schools from the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area will take part in the 5th FINCA and will be granted free access to a package of short films that can be either downloaded, played online or both. This will allow teachers and community leaders to foster debates on the core topics of this edition among their students, thus promoting the active role of our audience and the community.

Aware of the transformational power of cinema, we aim at spreading critical content to not only raise awareness among the young, their families, teachers and social circles, but also encourage the online sharing of practices and knowledge that might rekindle hope for the present generation, which, as Greta Thunberg says, feels they have been robbed of their future. The young have a lot to say and a lot to do: all they need is the tools for those stories to be told and shared.

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